Alcohol Self Assessment

Almost empty mug of beer and cigarette burning in ashtray uid 1344166Individual drinking habits may be found on a continuum from responsible drinking through alcohol abuse to alcoholism, or physical dependence.

There are many signs that may point to an alcohol problem. Drunkenness on its own or solitary drinking does not necessarily indicate alcoholism. The questionnaire will be meaningful to you only if you are honest with yourself when taking it.

The important question is: Is your use of alcohol creating significant negative consequences in your life?

  • Do you sometimes drink heavily after a setback or an argument, or when you receive a poor grade?
  • When you experience trouble or are undergoing stress, do you always drink more heavily than usual?
  • Can you handle more liquor now than you could when you first began drinking?
  • Have you ever awakened the “morning after” and found that you could not remember part of the evening before, even though your friends said that you didn’t pass out?
  • When drinking with others, do you try to have just a few additional drinks when they won’t know of it?
  • Are there times when you feel uncomfortable if alcohol isn’t available?
  • Have you noticed lately that when you start drinking you’re in more of a hurry to get to the first drink than you used to be?
  • Do you sometimes have negative thoughts or feelings about your drinking?
  • Are you secretly irritated when your friends or family discuss your drinking?
  • Do you often want to keep drinking after your friends have said that they’ve had enough?
  • When you’re sober, do you often regret things you have done or said while drinking?
  • Have you tried switching brands or following different plans for controlling your drinking?
  • Have you often failed to keep promises you have made to yourself about controlling or cutting down on your drinking?
  • Do you try to avoid your girlfriend/boyfriend when you are drinking?
  • Are you having an increasing number of school, work, or financial problems?
  • Do more people seem to be treating you unfairly without good reason?
  • Do you eat very little or irregularly when you’re drinking?
  • Do you sometimes have the “shakes” in the morning and find that it helps to have a drink?
  • Have you noticed lately that you cannot drink as much as you once did?

If you can answer “yes” to several of these questions, your drinking is causing problems for you and professional consultation can help prevent problems from getting more intense or numerous. Additionally you may find help at Alcoholics Anonymous.

Some people resolve to curb their drinking and can do so for a time only to have their alcohol problems persist or reoccur. The drinking habits of alcohol abuse or alcoholism can become very entrenched.

Teen Survival Guide; Free eBook download

The Teen Survival Guide to Dating and Relating: Real-World Advice on Guys, Girls, Growing Up, and Getting Along

When my daughter became a senior in high school, I knew it wouldn’t be long before she left for college. I felt happy that she was about to start a new chapter in her life and proud of her success in getting to this point. But I also felt sad.Not only was I going to miss having my smart, funny, talkative, wildly creative daughter living at home, but I was also going to miss her wonderful friends. I wouldn’t hear what was going on in their day-to-day lives anymore, and I wouldn’t be able to help them sort things out

This book includes more than one hundred letters from teens who wrote tome for advice. (To protect the teens’ privacy, I decided not to use real names or any specific details that might identify a particular letter writer. Still, the letters and situations are absolutely real.) The letters let you find out what other teens are going through and see how their experiences are similar to your own

Maybe you’re thinking, “What makes her such an expert on relationships?”I don’t claim to be an expert (and neither does Terra!). But, just like you, I’ve had experiences that have taught me about myself and life. As a student, a teacher, a writer, a traveller, an actor, a director, a daughter, a sister, an aunt, a friend, a mom, and a wife, I’ve spent years becoming comfortable with who I am and learning what it takes to get along with others. My advice is always based on what I know about healthy relationships, which are the only kind worth having.

Download the free copy of the Teen Survival Guide below.

The Teen Survival Guide to Dating and Relating: Real-World Advice on Guys, Girls, Growing Up, and Getting Along


Parent’s Guide to the Teen Brain

da4f2eff-2c50-4df2-9c3f-2fff5e064ea5 A Parent’s Guide to the Teen Brain

The Partnership for a Drug Free America has made fostering the parent-teen connection easier with the release of "A Parent’s Guide to the Teen Brain," a digital, science-based resource for parents that explains adolescent brain processes and offers tips for communicating and helping teens make good decisions.

With video, humorous interactive segments, role-playing and advice from experts, parents learn that ongoing brain development contributes to the vexing teen behaviors that confound and often put parents off – impulsiveness, rebellion, high emotions, questionable judgment and risk-taking.

The resource also includes tips to help parents establish (or re-create) the parent-teen relationship so essential to guiding teens through any one of the number of challenges they face, alcohol and drug temptations included.

http://www.drugfree.org/teenbrain

Partnership for a Drug-Free America (PDFA)
Website: http://www.drugfreeamerica.org

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders are 100% Preventable

FASDs are 100% preventable if a woman doesn’t drink alcohol while she is pregnant.

Learn more about the cause, signs, and treatments and what you can do if you think your child might have an FASD.

The Story of Iyal

This video tells the story of one family living with FASDs. Every family has unique experiences, challenges, and successes. The intent of this video is not to endorse specific interventions, but to share one family’s story and hope.

 

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) are a group of conditions that can occur in a person whose mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. These effects can include physical problems and problems with behavior and learning. Often, a person with an FASD has a mix of these problems.

Read more about FASDs:

Cause and Prevention

FASDs are caused by a woman drinking alcohol during pregnancy. There is no known amount of alcohol that is safe to drink while pregnant. There is also no safe time to drink during pregnancy and no safe kind of alcohol to drink while pregnant.

Full story at; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Best I Can Be: Living with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome-Effects (Revised) (Mom’s Choice Awards Recipient) by Jodee Kulp
Finding Perspective… Raising Successful Children Affected by Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders by Liz Lawryk

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    Adult couple arguing on street Al-anon in Israel

    Studies have found that when actively drinking, an alcoholic affects at least four people around him or her.

    According to members of Alanon (a 12-step support group for relatives and friends of alcoholics), spouses and children of alcoholics often suffer from depression, mood swings, anger, guilt, and resentment of their situation and a feeling of isolation.

    Ariel S., a long-time member of Alanon, said, “My husband was addicted to alcohol and I was addicted to him.” She said that after she went to her first Alanon meeting, she learned what is called the “3 Cs.”

    • I didn’t cause alcoholism,
    • I can’t control it and
    • I can’t cure it,'” she said.

    Learning that alcoholism was a disease helped her understand her husband’s situation, relieved her guilt and helped her improve her life.

    “Only people who have lived with alcoholism understand how terrible and hopeless you feel,” she said. “But going to meetings gave me a new sense of hope.”

    Full story and links at The Jerusalem Post

    See also;

    12-Step Programs Offer Broad Benefits

    Big book 12-Step Programs Offer Broad Benefits, Study Says

    A study of Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step oriented self-help programs finds that they can help most people recover from alcoholism, even those who are not religious or have mental-health problems.

    The Pacific Institute on Research and Education (PIRE) reported that researchers tracked a group of 227 alcoholics over three years and found that those who had attended AA or other self-help programs after treatment had higher rates of abstinence, and drank less if they did relapse. The results cut across gender and religious lines and held regardless of psychiatric history or whether the patient had previously attended AA or other similar programs.

    “Here’s a widespread, chronic disorder that seems to respond well to an inexpensive resource — mutual-help groups such as AA,” said study co-author Robert Stout, Ph.D., director of the Decision Sciences Institute at PIRE. “Not only do we need to get more addicts engaged in these groups, but we also need to gather evidence on this issue and make sure that the public, policy-makers and practitioners know about it.”

    Added co-author John F. Kelly: “There is a clear dose-response relationship: If you don’t go to any meetings, you have the worst outcomes. If you go to a few, you have a little bit better outcome, and if you go to a lot, you have an even better outcome.” Kelly is the associate director of the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Addiction Research Program.

    The study was published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

    From Join Together

    See also;